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Private Revenue Perfins of Victoria

An Elsmore Coath Howard production

The authors would welcome your comments additions or input into this work

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Section 2 - Commercial Overprints

D

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DANE BROS.a

User: Dane Bros

Grocers, Wine & Spirits

Address: 1 Main St, Stawell, VIC

Revenue Use: 

1915 Series 2d

Rarity Scale:

 

1915 Series 2d R4

Background: Robert William Dane was born at Mile End Road, London, in December, 1832. At the age of 20, he married Sophia Field, and migrated to Victoria on the ‘Jannetge’ in 1854. After trying his luck on the goldfields of New Bendigo (St Arnaud) and Simpson’s Rush (Maryborough) he reached Pleasant Creek (also known as “The Reefs”) in June, 1856, where he took up a claim on Sloan’s Reef, near where Dane’s store would later be erected.

Sophia Dane was the first woman to live on The Reefs and their eldest Australian born child, Florence, was the first child born in what later re-named Stawell.

Dane worked the alluvial diggings before turning to quartz mining, his syndicate erecting the second quartz crushing machinery in the area. In 1857, Dane sold out in exchange for a mob of cattle valued at £255 with which he started dairying near the Newington mine..

With the erection of a Chilean mill at Concongella Creek, Dane opened the Machine Hotel opposite in 1858 (to service the needs of thirsty workers), while still operating the dairy. When the mill ceased operation in 1861/2, Dane fell back on the dairy business.

In 1863, after a 6 month visit to the Shotover gold rush (New Zealand), Dane sold his cattle and started a bakery with Percy Aylwin at Doctor’s Creek but sold out a year later, purchasing a site at 1 Main Street on the corner of Layzell Street, Stawell, where he erected a bakery. Located opposite the post office and next to A. Mackay the solicitor, the store was ideally placed to prosper. Robert Dane applied for a Grocer’s Licence in 1881, thereafter advertising as “Baker, grocer, provision merchant, wines and spirits”

Robert Dane died in March, 1908, after retiring from public life in 1904 and handing over the business to his four sons, Herbert, Charles Stanley, Francis Walter and Henry Seville. The brothers formed a partnership, the business trading as Dane Brothers.

Herbert Dane died in 1922 and Henry Seville Dane retired, thereby dissolving the partnership, the business was then carried on by the remaining two brothers and Clyde Cameron Dane (son of Herbert) until this partnership was also dissolved by the retirement of Charles Stanley Dane and Francis Dane on 30 June, 1923. The business then continued with the partnership of Clyde Cameron Dane and Robert William Dane (son of Charles Stanley).

At the end of June, 1922, the bakery part of the business was sold, the partners intending to retain the profitable grocery and wine and spirits business, and expand in other directions. In 1924, Dane Bros were appointed agents for James Hardie & Co’s Engineering Supplies Department, the rapid expansion of business resulting in the purchase of premises (occupied by W.E. Edgerton) in Main Street on the corner with Doyle Lane, and opposite the Bull and Mouth Hotel. These the partners proceeded to turn into modern premises, closing the original store (opened by Robert William Dane at no.1, Main Street) in January, 1926.

In March, 1960, C.S. Earle and V.W. Earle purchased the business of Dane Bros which celebrated its centenary under the Dane Bros name in April, 1965.

The business was turned into a self-service store and traded as Dane’s Saveway then Dane’s Tuckerbag for about 8 years before Changing to Earle’s SSW in about 1986.

In the 1950s the Dane Memorial Seat was erected in a Stawell park by Lilian Dane in honour of her grandfather, Robert William Dane, “a pioneer of Stawell”.

Device: Handstamp

Related Patterns: Nil

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DAVID SYME/& CO. LIMITED.a

User: The Age

Newspaper

Address: Address: 233 Collins St, Melbourne, VIC

Revenue Use: 

1915 Series 2d

Rarity Scale:

 

1915 Series 2d R4

 

Background: *In June 1856 the Cooke’s sold The Age newspaper to Ebenezer Syme, a Scottish-born businessman, and James McEwan, an ironmonger and founder of McEwans & Co, for 2,000 pounds at auction. The first edition under the new owners was on 17 June 1856. From its foundation the paper was self-consciously liberal in its politics: "aiming at a wide extension of the rights of free citizenship and a full development of representative institutions," and supporting "the removal of all restrictions upon freedom of commerce, freedom of religion and - to the utmost extent that is compatible with public morality - upon freedom of personal action."

 

Ebenezer Syme was elected to the Victorian Legislative Assembly shortly after buying The Age, and his brother David Syme soon came to dominate the paper, editorially and managerially. When Ebenezer died in 1860, David became editor-in-chief, a position he retained until his death in 1908, although a succession of editors did the day-to-day editorial work. In 1891 Syme bought out Ebenezer's heirs and McEwan's and became sole proprietor. He built up The Age into Victoria's leading newspaper. In circulation it soon overtook its rivals The Herald and The Argus, and by 1890 it was selling 100,000 copies a day, making it one of the world's most successful newspapers.

 

Under Syme's control The Age exercised enormous political power in Victoria. It supported liberal politicians such as Graham Berry, George Higinbotham and George Turner, and other leading liberals such as Alfred Deakin and Charles Pearson furthered their careers as The Age journalists. Syme was originally a free trader, but converted to protectionism through his belief that Victoria needed to develop its manufacturing industries behind tariff barriers. In the 1890s The Age was a leading supporter of Australian federation and of the White Australia policy.

 

After Syme's death the paper remained in the hands of his three sons, with his eldest son Herbert Syme becoming general manager until his death in 1939. Syme's will, prevented the sale of any equity in the paper during his sons' lifetimes, an arrangement designed to protect family control but which had the effect of starving the paper of investment capital for 40 years. Under the management of Sir Geoffrey Syme (1908–42), and his chosen editors Gottlieb Schuler and Harold Campbell, The Age failed to modernise, and gradually lost market share to The Argus and to the tabloid The Sun News-Pictorial, although its classified advertisement sections kept the paper profitable. By the 1940s the paper's circulation was smaller than it had been in 1900, and its political influence also declined. Although it remained more liberal than the extremely conservative Argus, it lost much of its distinct political identity.

 

The historian Sybil Nolan writes: "Accounts of The Age in these years generally suggest that the paper was second-rate, outdated in both its outlook and appearance. Walker described a newspaper which, had fallen asleep in the embrace of the Liberal Party; "querulous," "doddery" and "turgid" are some of the epithets applied by other journalists. It is inevitably criticised not only for its increasing conservatism, but for its failure to keep pace with innovations in layout and editorial technique so dramatically demonstrated in papers like The Sun News-Pictorial and The Herald."

 

In 1942 David Syme's last surviving son, Oswald Syme, took over the paper. He modernised the paper's appearance and standards of news coverage (removing classified advertisements from the front page and introducing photographs, long after other papers had done so). In 1948, convinced the paper needed outside capital, he persuaded the courts to overturn his father's will and floated David Syme and Co. as a public company, selling 400,000 pounds worth of shares, enabling a badly needed technical modernisation of the newspaper's production. A takeover attempt by the Warwick Fairfax family, publishers of The Sydney Morning Herald, was beaten off. This new lease on life allowed The Age to recover commercially, and in 1957 it received a great boost when The Argus ceased publication.

Device: Handstamped

Related Patterns: David Syme.b & .c

*Wikipedia

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DAVID SYME/& CO. LIMITED.b

User: The Age

Newspaper

Address: Address: 233 Collins St, Melbourne, VIC

Revenue Use: 

1930 Series [No wmk] 3d

Rarity Scale:

 

1930 Series [No wmk] 3d R4

Background: See David Syme & Co Ltd.a

Device: Preprinted

Related Patterns: David Syme .a & .c

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DAVID SYME/& CO. LIMITED.c

User: The Age

Newspaper

Address: 233 Collins St, Melbourne, VIC

Revenue Use: 

1932 Series 3d

Rarity Scale:

 

1932 Series 3d R4

Background: See David Syme & Co Ltd.a

Device: Preprinted

Related Patterns: David Syme .a & .b

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DAVID SYME/& CO./LIMITED.d

 

1966 Series                  1981 Series

User: The Age

Newspaper

Address: 233 Collins St, Melbourne, VIC

Revenue Use: 

1966 Series 5c

1981 Series 10c

Rarity Scale:

 

1966 Series 5c R4

 

1981 Series 10c S [full remainder sheets are in the market place]

Background: See David Syme & Co Ltd.a

Device: Preprinted

Related Patterns: David Syme .a & .b

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Dimmick & Long.a

User: Dimmick & Long

Estate Agents & Auctioneers

Address: 142-150 Union Rd, Surrey Hills, Melbourne, VIC

Revenue Use: 

1945 Series 2d

Rarity Scale:

 

1945 Series 2d R4

Background: William Roy Dimmick and Thomas Alfred Long commenced trading as ‘Dimmick and Long, house and land agents’ in September 1918, when both men were already resident in Canterbury.

Dimmick was born in Essendon in 1888 and was a clerk before joining with Long. Long was born in Frankston in 1874 and was also described as being a clerk prior to joining with Dimmick.

Their business premises were at “The Corner”, Union Rd, Surrey Hills, “opposite the station”. The firm did not move from this address. Council rate books for 1924 show Dimmick & Long owned the premises, and three adjoining shops (to 150 Union Road), which were rented out to tradesmen (butcher etc).

In 1938 the entire premises from 142 to 150 Union Road were rebuilt to include the Surrey (Picture) Theatre in which William Dimmick and Thomas Long were part owners, together with L. Rossiter and R. Mitchell (1939-1950). The estate agency continued to occupy the corner position in the new building. The cinema closed in October 1960.

William Dimmick died in 1947 aged 59. Thomas Long retired to Sorrento in about 1928 but is listed as a garage proprietor in Camberwell from 1937 to 1949. He died in Burwood in 1951 age 74. The estate agency of Dimmick & Long continued to trade under that name until 1962.

Device: Handstamp

Related Patterns: Nil

Sources:

Electoral rolls; Ancestry; Sands & McDougall directories;

Cinema and Audience Research Project.

Image a40901 credit 'Harold Paynting Collection, State Library of Victoria'

Exterior Surrey Picture Theatre, 142-150 Union Rd.

Office of Dimmick Long Estate Agents, 142 Union Rd. c1952

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DODSHUNG & SONS / MELBOURNE.a

User: Dodshung & Sons [unknown]

Address: Melbourne, VIC

Revenue Use: 

1945 Series 2d

Rarity Scale:

 

1945 Series 2d R4

Background: See D in Perfin Section

Device: Handstamp

Related Patterns: Unconfirmed - See D in Perfin Section

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