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Private Revenue Perfins of New South Wales

An Elsmore Coath production

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R

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R.a

User: Royle & Co

Agency Company

Address: 5 Bond St, Sydney, NSW

Revenue Use:

QV 1872-1908 issue 6d, 1/-, 1/6, 2/-, 2/6, 3/-, 4/-, 5/-, 12/6, 15/-, £1

QV 1880-1902 issue 9d

KEDVII 1909-28 issue 6d, 2/-, 2/6d, 4/-, 10/-

1917 Numeral issue 1d, 2d

Rarity Scale:

QV 1872-1908 issue 6d R3, 1/- R3, 1/6 R3, 2/- R3, 2/6 R3, 3/- R3, 4/- R3, 5/- R3, 12/6 R4, 15/- R4, £1 R4

QV 1880-1902 issue 9d R3

KEDVII 1909-28 issue 6d R4, 2/- R4, 2/6d R4, 4/- R4, 10/- R4

1917 Numeral issue 1d R2, 2d R2

Background: *Charles Royle was born in Kent, England, and he was a partner in the firm of John Connell and Co (London) where he was principally involved with imports to Australia. Royle moved to New South Wales in 1879 and shortly after established an agency business with B T (or T R) Hogg named Royle & Hogg.

In 1880 they occupied a new warehouse at 9 Bond St, Sydney, NSW, where they acted as Commercial agents for an array of manufacturers, including Brinsmead Pianos, art works from Mayer and Co. (Munich and London), H. L. Muller's gas-making machines, and of all things, pickles from John Stephens, of Gloucester, as well as paper bag products and others. They also housed the offices for the Standard Fire and Marine Insurance Company of New Zealand.

In August 1883 the partners separated company and T R Hogg and Co were established at 71 Clarence St and Royle and Co, retaining most of the agencies, moved to 5 Bond St.

Royle expanded the Insurance part of the business continuing as agents for Standard Fire and Marine Insurance Co (NZ), and later Sun Insurance.

Royle built up the business and even accepted Government appointments, serving as the Consul-General for Paraguay for a period. Royle died in 1911 but the company continued to trade for some time after his death, until at least 1932, although it seems to have faded over time.

Device: The R device was most likely a single die device and it produced a distinctive large R pattern. Given the size of the pattern it was more than likely designed to be used on the large format Queen Victoria revenue issues although it is sometimes seen on the smaller format issues as well. The pattern is only found on revenue stamps and its usage was from about 1902 until at least 1910.

Related patterns: Nil

* Sydney Diocesan Directory

* Trove

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REA.a

User: Royal Exchange Assurance of London

Insurance Provider

Address: 75-77 Pitt St, Sydney, NSW

Revenue Use:

KEDVII 1909-28 issue 4d, 8d, 1/-, 2/-, 3/-, 5/-, 6/-, 10/-

Numeral 1929-66 issue 3d, 6d, 8d, 9d, 1/-, 2/-, 3/-, 8/-[brown],12/-, 18/-, 18/-[yellow], £1

Rarity Scale:

KEDVII 1909-28 issue 4d R4, 8d R4, 1/- R4, 2/- R4, 3/- R4, 5/- R4, 6/- R4, 1-/- R4

Numeral 1929-66 issue 3d R4, 6d R4, 8d R4, 9d R4, 1/- R1, 2/- R4, 3/- R4, 8/-[brown] R4, 12/- R4, 18/- R4, 18/-[yellow] R4, £1 R4

Background: *Royal Exchange Assurance was founded in England 1720 and was one of the first insurance companies to receive legal status by Royal Charter. Originally established for marine insurance, the company quickly expanded into fire and life insurance as well, thereby becoming Britain's first composite insurer.

Royal Exchange expanded rapidly, both in England and Overseas moving into personal accident (1898), employers' liability and fidelity guarantee (1899), burglary insurance (1900), accident insurance and auto insurance (1917).

Royal Exchange’s overseas businesses grew, initially through foreign agents, and later through the creation of branch offices. Between 1890 and 1912, the Royal Exchange opened branches in the United States, Canada, South Africa, New Zealand, India, Egypt, South America, and across Europe.

Royal Exchange arrived in Australia in 1924 via the acquisition of a raft of smaller insurers including State Assurance Co Ltd, British Equitable Assurance Co. Ltd., Java Sea and Fire Insurance Co. Ltd., Congregational Insurance Co. of Australia Ltd., Australia of the Sea Insurance Co. Ltd., Fire and Accident Insurance Co. of Australasia Ltd. and the Batavia Sea and Fire Insurance Co. Ltd.

Most of these companies continued to trade in their own names and in 1953 the Batavia Sea and Fire Insurance was reformed as the Australian & Eastern Insurance Co Ltd.  In 1958 Royal Exchange merged with Atlas Assurance (see A.a).

In 1968 Royal Exchange and Guardian Assurance merged to become Guardian Royal Exchange (GRE) Insurance which at the time was Britain's fifth largest composite insurer. In the eighties the company was re badged as AXA Insurance.

Device: The Royal Exchange Assurance Company used two devices with the letter pattern REA and the patterns from these devices are only found on the revenue stamps of NSW. This first device REA.a was most likely a single die device and it came into service in about 1928 (possibly earlier) and was in use until 1930. The REA.a pattern is distinctive with its thick pins and sweeping front leg of the R. The thick pins removed a great deal of paper from the stamps but this was not an issue as the contemporary stamps were the larger format Edward VII issues. However in 1929 the NSW Government issued the smaller Numeral series and the device was less suited to these smaller format stamps.

The REA.a pattern is not found after 1930 and it seems that the REA.a device was altered in order to create a pattern with the letter combination BEA which is only known used in 1931 and like REA.a and REA.b it is only found used on revenue stamps. (see BEA.a) Although there is no known written record that REA.a became BEA.a, the timing of the use of BEA.a immediately following the withdrawal of REA.a, and the fact that the pin thickness and pin locations of BEA.a and REA.a are so similar makes such a modification the most likely scenario.

Oddly this REA.a pattern is found used on stamps that also carry Royal Exchange Assurance security overprints. Evidence from policy documents and fragments shows that the stamps were perforated prior to use, so there is no suggestion that the perfin was being used as a cancelling punch. This policy of using security overprints and perfins concurrently was also practiced by Alliance Assurance around the same time. (see ACO.a)

Related Patterns: Refer to other Atlas, Royal Exchange and related company patterns in:

NSW:   A.a  A.b  A.c  A.d  BEA.a  GAC.a  REA.b  SAC.a

Other – Section 2 Commercial Overprints

           A(Atlas).a

           Royal/Exchange/Assurance.a

           State/Assurance/Co Ltd.a

QLD:  A.a

*referenceforbusiness.com

 

Trove

 

AXA web site

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REA.b

User: Royal Exchange Assurance Co

Insurance Provider

Address: 75-77 Pitt St, Sydney, NSW.

From 1960 – ‘Kindersley House’ 33–35 Bligh through to 20–26 O'Connell St's, Sydney, NSW

Revenue Use: 

Numeral 1929-66 issue 3d, 4d, 6d, 8d, 9d, 1/-, 1/6, 2/-, 2/6, 3/-, 4/-, 5/-, 6/-, 8/-[brown], 8/-, 10/-, 14/-, £1, 30/-, £5

Decimal 1966 issue 3c, 8c, 20c, 35c, $1.60

Rarity Scale:

Numeral 1929-66 issue 3d R3, 4d R3, 6d R1, 8d R3, 9d R3, 1/- R1, 1/6 R2, 2/- R2, 2/6 R2, 3/- R1, 4/- R3, 5/- R2, 6/- R1, 8/-[brown] R3, 8/- R4, 10/- R3, 14/- R4, £1 R1, 30/- R2, £5 R4

Decimal 1966 issue 3c R4, 8c R4, 20c R4, 35c R4, $1.60 R4

Background: See REA.a

Device: The second REA device to come into service was REA.b and it was another single head device and it is found used from 1932 until at least 1966. The pattern is of a similar size to REA.a but the pins are thinner and the R is of a more conventional shape.

The thinner pins meant that less paper was removed and this made the device more suitable for use on the Numeral series issues than the earlier REA.a. However the pattern is still relatively large when compared to the Numeral issues and when struck in positions 1, 3, 5 or 7 it can often appear as a partial.

The device was robust and remained in service for 30 + years although late usage in the 1960’s shows an increasing number of blind pins.

Related Patterns: Refer to other Atlas, Royal Exchange and related company patterns in:

NSW:   A.a  A.b  A.c  A.d  BEA.a  GAC.a  REA.a  SAC.a

Other – Section 2 Commercial Overprints

           A(Atlas).a

           Royal/Exchange/Assurance.a

           State/Assurance/Co Ltd.a

QLD:  A.a

See SAC.a for Royal Exchange Assurance using SAC.a perfins.

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RH/&Co.a

User: Robert Harper & Co Pty Ltd

Wholesale Grocers and Merchants

Address: Day St, Sydney, NSW

             388-390 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, VIC

             Later: 133 Rouse St , Port Melbourne, VIC

             53-81 Albert St, Brisbane, QLD

Revenue Use:

1880 issue 2d 

Rarity Scale:

1880 issue 2d R4

Background: *Robert Harper was born in February 1842 in Glasgow, Scotland but he immigrated to Melbourne with his family in August 1856. He worked for J. F. McKenzie & Co, becoming a partner in about 1863. In 1865 the partnership was dissolved and Harper established Robert Harper & Co., initially in Flinders Lane, trading in tea, coffee and spices from the East Indies and later in oatmeal and flour. The company’s growth was assisted by the acquisition of the Oriental Rice Mill Company and subsequently the mills of W Degrave & Co.

Harper’s brother William became a partner and another brother, John, joined them in about 1883. The company went on to operate branch factories in Sydney (1877), Adelaide (1882), Brisbane (1882- some reports 1887), and Fremantle (1895) and later in the other colonies including New Zealand. Depots were also established at Bendigo, Ballarat, Rockhampton, Townsville and Toowoomba.

In 1888 the company transferred its operations from the Melbourne CBD to Port Melbourne and the company was restructured and registered as Robert Harper and Company Limited in December 1896. Later in about 1914 it converted to a public company. The company manufactured starch (including Silver Star Starch) and a wide range of food products including breakfast cereals and oatmeal, lentils, deserts, spices, bird seed and stock food. The company acquired the business of Malties Pty Ltd in February 1955.

Away from his core businesses from the mid-1870s Harper diversified, investing in banking, land, sugar, coal and timber. President of the Victorian Chamber of Manufactures in 1877-78 he was also a long-standing director of the Kauri Timber Co. as well as several insurance companies and the Commercial Bank of Australia.

Harper entered politics in 1878 defeating Alfred Deakin (later the 2nd Prime Minister of Australia) by a narrow margin and later in 1882 he secured the seat of East Bourke and held it until 1889 and later from 1891. Harper retired from parliament in 1913 and died at his home in South Yarra on 9 January 1919. Survived by his wife, one of his two daughters and four of his five sons.

Device: The RH/CO.a device was most likely a single die device and it is most commonly seen on postage stamps of NSW and Australia and only very rarely on revenue stamps of NSW. The device was in use from at least 1906 until 1932. In previous studies of private perfins usage has been reported on the postage stamps of Queensland.

This is most likely the result of usage of Queensland stamps in Sydney as the postmark evidence does not show any usage in Queensland. The sale of stamps of various Australian colonies in other States of Australia was fairly common around 1912 as the Postmaster Generals departments sought to use up stocks of Colonial stamps prior to the issuing of the first Australian stamps in 1913.

Related Patterns: Refer to other Robert Harper patterns in:

QLD: Other – Section 2 Commercial Overprints 'Silver Starch'

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RIC.a

 User: Royal Insurance Co Ltd.

General Insurance Provider

Address: Royal Insurance Buildings, Cnr Spring & Pitt St's, Sydney

Revenue Use: 

Numeral 1929-66 issue 2d, 3d, 3d[no wmk], 4d, 6d, 8d, 9d, 1/-, 1/6, 2/-, 2/-[no wmk], 2/6, 3/-, 4/-, 5/-, 6/-, 8/-, 10/-, 12/-, 14/-, 16/-, 18/-, £1, 30/-, £5, £10

Decimal 1966 issue 1c, 3c, 4c, 5c, 6c, 8c, 15c, 20, 50c, $1.40, $1.60, $2

Rarity Scale:

Numeral 1929-66 issue 2d R4, 3d R1, 3d[no wmk] R4, 4d R2, 6d R1, 8d R3, 9d R2, 1/- R1, 1/6 R1, 2/- R1, 2/-[no wmk] R3, 2/6 R2, 3/- R1, 4/- R2, 5/- R1, 6/- R1, 8/- R4, 10/- R1, 12/- R4, 14/- R4, 16/- R4, 18/- R4, £1 R1, 30/- R3, £5 R3, £10 R3

Decimal 1966 issue 1c R4, 3c R4, 4c R4, 5c R4, 8c R4, 15c R4, 20c R4, 50c R4, $1.40 R4, $1.60 R4, $2 R4

Background: The Royal Insurance Company was established in Liverpool in May 1845 and expanded quickly into overseas markets establishing offices in Australia, Canada, Singapore, and South America by the 1850’s and later the US.

By the 1860’s Royal had 10 offices in Australia and it continued to grow through mergers at home and abroad.  In 1919 it acquired the rival Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Company in what was, at the time the largest merger in British Insurance history. This merger was a trend that was to continue across the industry through the 20th century culminating in Royals merger with Sun Alliance, itself a product of mergers between the Sun, Alliance, London and later Phoenix Insurance companies.

The resulting company Royal Sun Alliance was formed in 1996 and was later (2008) rebadged as RSA Insurance Group and is headquartered in London. As part of these changes the companies activities in Australia and New Zealand were restructured under the Promina Brand and the General Insurance arm was renamed Vero.

Device: This RIC.a device was most likely a single die device as examples of joined stamps and multiple strikes on a single stamp do not show a consistent relationship between each other.

The pattern is found used on both NSW revenue and Australian postage stamps over the period 1932-1965, but usage on revenue stamps continued until 1967. Usage on postage stamps in the 1960’s is uncommon and this is consistent with some other insurance companies, such as Mercantile Mutual, who chose to discontinue the use of perfins on postage stamps but continue to use them on revenue stamps.

The device had thick pins and produced clear strikes, however late usage from 1965 shows a greater incidence of blind pins and indeed some strikes that are entirely formed of blind pins. This may indicate poor application of the strike by the user but it may have been that the device was in need of repair and this may have in turn lead to its discontinuance.

Related patterns: Refer to other Royal Insurance patterns in:

NSW: RI/CO.a RI/CO/LD.a RI/CO/LD.b

QLD:  RI/CO/LD.a RI/CO/LD.b

TAS:  RI/CO.a RI/CO.b RI/CO/LD.a 

WA:  RI/CO/LD.a

 

Royal Insurance Co merger. Document showing RIC.a perfin.

The Australian Estates Co, agents for and cancelled by The Lancashire Insurance Company

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RI/Co.a

 User: Royal Insurance Co Ltd.

General Insurance Provider

Address: Royal Insurance Buildings, Cnr Spring & Pitt St's, Sydney

Revenue Use:

Numeral 1929-66 issue 10/-

Rarity Scale:

Numeral 1929-66 issue 10/- R4

Background: See RIC.a

Device: This RI/CO.a device is most likely a modification to the RI/CO/LD.b device which was itself, most likely, a modification of an earlier circa 1912 RI/CO/LD.a device. All these devices were located in the Sydney office and their usages do not overlap as follows:

RI/CO/LD.a (circa 1912 type) 1912-1928 and later in 1966-1967, RI/CO/LD.b 1929-1930.

RI/CO.a (this device) 1931.

RIC.a 1932-1967.

This RI/CO.a device was only in use for a very short time and as a consequence it is rare, only a handful of examples have been seen by the authors.

This RI/CO.a has been reported in previous studies of Australian private perfins but although it has been shown with the correct thicker pins it has been confused with reports of partial strikes of the c1912, and thinner pinned RI/CO/LD.a device. See RI/CO/LD.a below. This confusion has lead the authors of these earlier works to incorrectly report both the usage periods and locations of these strikes.

The only RI/CO with a pattern similar to the C1912 RI/CO/LD device was located in Sydney and it had a thick pinned format.  Thin pinned patterns that appear to be RI/CO’s are partial strikes of one or more of the c1912 RI/CO/LD devices see RI/CO/LD.a.

Related patterns: Refer to other Royal Insurance patterns in:

NSW: RIC.a RI/CO/LD.a RI/CO/LD.b

QLD:  RI/CO/LD.a RI/CO/LD.b

TAS:  RI/CO.a RI/CO.b RI/CO/LD.a

WA:  RI/CO/LD.a

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RI/Co/LD.a

 User: Royal Insurance Co Ltd.

General Insurance Provider

Address: Royal Insurance Buildings, Cnr Spring & Pitt St's, Sydney, NSW

Revenue Use:

KEDVII 1909-28 issue 1d, 2d, 3d, 4d, 6d, 8d, 1/-, 1/6, 2/-, 2/6, 3/-, 4/-, 5/-, 6/-, 8/-, 10/-, £1

Wmk crown A 1d, 4d, 1/-. Wmk crown A inv 1d, 1/-

Underprint 4d, 8d

Numeral 1917 issue 2d

Rarity Scale:

KEDVII 1909-28 issue 1d R3, 2d R3, 3d R3, 4d R1, 6d R3, 8d R3, 1/- R1, 1/6 R3, 2/- R4, 2/6 R4, 3/- R2, 4/- R3, 5/- R3, 6/- R3, 8/0 R4, 10/- R4, £1 R3

Wmk crown A 1d R3, 4d R4, 1/- R3. Wmk crown A inv 1d R4, 1/- R4

Underprint 4d R4, 8d R4

Numeral 1917 issue 2d R4

Background: See RIC.a

Device: In 1912 Royal Insurance purchased a number of near identical devices for their offices across Australia including Melbourne, Sydney (this device), Newcastle, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth. From the evidence of multiple strikes it is clear that these were a series of single die devices. There may have been more than one device for country offices in Queensland or larger offices such as Melbourne and Sydney.

Therefore it is difficult to confirm how many of these circa 1912 devices there were as the patterns from the various devices are so close. Some variation between the patterns from these remote devices is noticeable but is so subtle that it cannot be catalogued.

It is worth considering the possibility that the pattern was a result of a single device, most likely located in the Melbourne office,  hich was used to puncture stamps which were then distributed to the remote offices. However this is difficult to support given the usage on postage and revenue stamps of various States and the fact that the Company subsequently purchased a similar (RI/CO/LD) pattern device for the Launceston office in about 1930, as well as providing a series of RI/CO devices to the Launceston office between 1920 and 1969 and an RIC device to the Sydney office from 1932-1967. If you had a workable process from a central device then these other devices would not be required.

In previous studies of this pattern there have been a couple of small errors in the reporting of this circa 1912 RI/CO/LD devices/patterns as follows:

1. Report of an RI/CO pattern with an RI/CO that is the same as the circa 1912 RI/CO/LD (thin pins) pattern in various States:

This is most likely based on reports of partial strikes [see below graphic] of the full circa 1912 RI/CO/LD pattern. We have seen many examples of these patterns and all show evidence of the top of the LD generally in blind pins or in some instances just the outline of part of the pin visible under a microscope.

Partial Strike showing 2 blind pins for the top of LD.

These partial strikes are not common but they can be found on stamps of most capital cities and over nearly the entire usage period of the c1912 RI/CO/LD devices. Given this broad usage and distribution, and the fact that they show evidence of the LD, means that they are most likely an operator error or device malfunction that produces a partial strike rather than a separate pattern.

2. Report of 3 types of the Circa 1912 RI/CO/LD pattern:

The 1912 RI/CO/LD devices produce patterns which are near to identical so defining types is not possible. In previous studies the term 'type' has been used to describe a number of different forms of variation within a pattern such as, similar pattern images that may be the result of alterations to the die head, a similar die of a multi head device and the variation present in most service punctures.

Given that these circa 1912 RI/CO/LD devices were single die devices which produced essentially identical strikes over the life of the devices, the use of the term 'type' is not appropriate.

The noting of these 'types' may have been an attempt to describe the somewhat similar patterns such as Brisbane RI/CO/LD.b, (see Queensland listing) or the thicker pinned NSW pattern, RI/CO/LD.b (1929-30) of the Sydney office (see below) or indeed the Tasmanian RI/CO/LD.a (1930-63) of the Launceston office. (see Tasmanian listing).  However bundling together different patterns, created by remote devices under a single pattern listing is misleading and simplistic.

Sydney is known to have used a range of devices including a circa 1912 type RI/CO/LD device between 1912-1928 and later in 1966-1967, as well as a thicker pinned variety of the RI/CO/LD (see RI/CO/LD.b below) in 1929-1930, then an RI/CO device (see RI/CO.a above) with thicker pins that seems to be a modified version of the RI/CO/LD.b device and then an RIC device (see RIC.a above) between 1932-1967.

This RI/CO/LD.a pattern is found used at the Sydney office on both postage and revenue stamps over the same periods.

Related patterns: Refer to other Royal Insurance patterns in:

NSW: RIC.a  RI/CO.a RI/CO/LD.b

QLD:  RI/CO/LD.a RI/CO/LD.b

TAS:  RI/CO.a RI/CO.b RI/CO/LD.a 

WA:  RI/CO/LD.a

 

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RI/Co/LD.b

 User: Royal Insurance Co Ltd.

General Insurance Provider

Address: Royal Insurance Buildings, Cnr Spring & Pitt St's, Sydney, NSW

Revenue Use:

KEDVII 1909-28 issue 4d, 2/-, 4/-, 6/-, 7/-, 10/-, £1

Numeral 1929-66 issue 2d, 4d, 1/-, 3/-, 5/-, 6/-, £1

1966 1c, 2c, 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, $1, $2, $10, $20

Rarity Scale:

KEDVII 1909-28 issue 4d R3, 2/- R4, 4/- R3, 6/- R4, 7/- R4, 10/- R4, £1 R3

Numeral 1929-66 issue 2d R4, 4d R4, 1/- R3, 3/- R4, 5/- R4, 6/- R4, 10/- R3, £1 R3

1966 1c R4, 2c R4, 5c R2, 10c R3, 20c R3, 50c R4, $1 R2, $2 R4, $10 R4, $20 R4

Background: See RIC.a

Device: This RI/CO/LD.b device was most likely a modification to the Sydney circa 1912 RI/CO/LD.a device. It has the same basic pattern but the pins are much thicker. The device was used on both postage stamps and the revenue stamps of NSW over the period 1928 until 1930.  Like all the other devices of the circa 1912 group it is a single die device.

The RI/CO/LD.b pattern is a tall one and the thicker pins from this modification would have produced strikes that removed a large amount of paper from the stamp. This is not an issue on the larger format Edward VII revenue stamps but it may have caused a problem when used on the smaller format NSW Numeral issues. This would support the case that the RI/CO.a device is a further modification of this RI/CO/LD.b device. (see RI/CO.a above).

Related patterns: Refer to other Royal Insurance patterns in:

NSW: RIC.a RI/CO.a RI/CO/LD.a

QLD:  RI/CO/LD.a RI/CO/LD.b

TAS:  RI/CO.a RI/CO.b RI/CO/LD.a

WA:  RI/CO/LD.a

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RK/Y.a

User: Ralph W King & Yuill

Stock Brokers

Address: 20 O'Connell St, Sydney, NSW

Revenue Use:

Numeral 1929-66 issue 1/6, 3/-

Rarity Scale:

Numeral 1929-66 issue 1/6 R4, 3/- R4

Background: *Ralph W. King and Yuill was a stockbroking partnership with seats on the Sydney Stock Exchange, that was formed in 1942 between Ralph W King and William Yuill.

Ralph King was born in Sydney in February 1885, son of a surveyor who worked mainly in the New England District of NSW. King’s first business was a partnership in an accountancy firm, Peterson and Ralph King, but this was interrupted by service in World War 1.  Following the war he served in various Government appointments before taking a seat on the Sydney Stock Exchange in 1926 and trading under the name of Ralph W King.

William Yuill, was born in Glenelg (SA) in June 1889 and initially worked in clerical and accounting positions in Adelaide before moving to Sydney in 1912. There he may have worked for his uncle who was the principal of the shipping company, G S Yuill & Co. This placement was interrupted by war service in 1918-19 but he returned to Shipping and by 1925 he was the Chief Clerk of the Australian Commonwealth Line of Steamers. That year he successfully applied for a seat on the Sydney Stock Exchange and he operated as a sole trader until 1932 when he encountered financial difficulties and he was forced to resign.  He was able to join a partnership with his friend Vincent Brownhill at Martyn and Brownhill and when Brownhill died in 1942, Yuill merged this firm with Ralph King to form Ralph W. King and Yuill.

Ralph W. King and Yuill flourished and they grew to be one of the larger Sydney firms and this included a branch office in Grafton. They were involved in the creation of the Short Term Acceptance Ltd, and in 1959 were one of the first firms to be permitted to trade on the short-term money market.

Device: The RK/Y.a device was most likely a single die device and it was in use in the early 1960’s. The pattern is quite rare and few examples have been sighted. Indeed so few have been found that earlier references had not included a full image of the pattern.

The pattern is only found on revenue stamps of NSW.

Related patterns: Nil

*'Sydney Stockbrokers' Salsbury and Sweeny (1992)

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