Perfins home page

 

Private Revenue Perfins of Victoria

An Elsmore Coath production

The authors would welcome your comments additions or input into this work

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  Y  Other

Back to States index

D

--------------------------------------------------------

DCo.a

User: W Dean & Co, later W & G Dean & Co, later Deans

Oil & Colour Merchants

Address: Equitable Place (off Collins St), Melbourne, VIC

Warehouse at Flinders Lane (East), Melbourne, VIC

Revenue Use:

1886-1899 Series, inscribed 'STAMP DUTY' 1d (shades)

Rarity Scale:

 

1886-1899 Series 1d R4

 

Background: *Note: In previous studies of Australian Private Perfins this pattern was provisionally assigned to Dalgety & Co. but this pattern has now been proved to Dean & Co because of a partial company cachet found on a revenue stamp which carried the words “Dean &….” As reported in SPPB #105 of April 2014.

 

Dean & Co (later W & G Dean & Co) was established in 1854 by brothers William & George Dean, the first Dean & Co. emporium was located off Elizabeth St, adjoining the then “Age” newspaper's office. As Melbourne grew, so too did Deans, expanding into the Age building and then to a five storey complex in Equitable Place (off Collins St).

 

The company specialised in brushes, paints and artists materials as well as building and painters material such as non-corrosive paints, varnishes, paper hangings, oils, paints, glass, and later bitumen roof sealants.

 

In 1880 Dean & Co. was one of the first businesses in Melbourne to use the new Edison-Bell phone and in 1896 their warehouse in Flinders lane was damaged by a serious fire that also damaged the building of fellow perfin user Beath, Schiess & Co.

 

The company continued to trade in the 20th Century and was later know as Deans, and they expanded into students needs by the 1960’s. In the mid 1980's they amalgamated with the Camden Art Centre (est. 1946) and the company become one of the largest retailers of art supplies in the southern hemisphere.

 

As of 2014 Deans Art is still an Australian owned & operated business, supplying expert advice and products to artists, designers & craftsmen from all spectrums, be they professional, student or hobbyists alike.

 

Device: The DCo.a pattern is made from a temporary die in a single die format. Such devices, which could produce these temporary patterns, were used by some Stamp Vendors in Melbourne from late 1800’s and early part of the 20th Century.

This particular pattern is known used in 1896. It is most commonly found on postage stamps.

Related Patterns: Refer to other Dean & Co patterns in:

VIC: W&/GD.a

* Trove

--------------------------------------------------------

DS/&Co.a

User: Dodgshun & Sons(unconfirmed) or David Syme & Co(unconfirmed)

Address:

Revenue Use: 

1886-1899 Series, inscribed 'STAMP DUTY' 1d (shades)

Rarity Scale:

 

1886-1899 Series 1d R4

 

Background: *User uncertain for Backgrounds of possible users companies see:

Dodgshun & Sons: refer to the William Dodgshun & Co under W

David Syme & Co: refer to the “Other” Section – Commercial Overprints letter D

There is more evidence to support the case for Dodgshun & Sons as the user than there is for David Syme & Co and this is due to evidence of perfin use in Tasmania.

There is a DS/&Co pattern that is made by a single die customised device with a similar scale and layout found used in Launceston. This DS/&Co device is attributed to Dodgshun & Sons, as they were known to have conducted a business from there prior to expanding to Melbourne and New Zealand.

In fact there have been some reports of DS/&Co like patterns made by temporary dies, such as the one that made DS/&Co.a, used in Tasmania. This is not consistent with our findings as all DS/&Co and indeed DS/&C patterns that we have seen, that are made from Temporary dies, carry Melbourne postmarks, which is consistent with the main location of the Stamp Vendors that used these Temporary devices.

Device: The DS/&Co.a pattern is made from a temporary die in a single die format. Such devices, which could produce these temporary patterns, were used by some Stamp Vendors in Melbourne from late 1800’s and early part of the 20th Century.

This particular pattern is known used in 1900. It is most commonly found on postage stamps.

Related Patterns: Refer to possible users patterns as follows:

Dodgshun & Sons:

VIC: WD/&Co.a, WD/&Co.b WD/&S.a

David Syme & Co:

VIC: Other – Section 2 Commercial Overprints

DAVID SYME/& CO. LIMITED.a , .b, .c and .d

 

*Tasmanian Philatelic Society Bulletin Board

--------------------------------------------------------

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  Y  Other

Back to States index

© copyright 2011

Perfins home page